Posts for: March, 2015

By Total Dental Care
March 25, 2015
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: tooth wear  
KeepanEyeonAbnormalToothWear

Tooth wear, especially on biting surfaces, is a normal part of aging — we all lose some of our tooth enamel as we grow older. Even primary (“baby”) teeth may show some wear before they’re lost. But there’s also excessive, premature tooth wear caused by disease or abnormal biting habits. This type of wear is cause for concern and action before it leads to tooth loss.

Normal tooth wear occurs because of what teeth naturally do — bite and chew. When teeth come together as we eat they generate a modest amount of force: between 13 and 23 pounds. Our teeth also make brief contacts hundreds to thousands times a day. Again, this produces force, though not to the extent we see with biting and chewing: somewhere between 0.75 and 7.5 pounds. These glancing contacts are actually good for dental health because they provide needed stimulation to the teeth and jaws that help the body maintain healthy bone and tooth attachments.

But parafunctional (outside the normal function) habits like teeth grinding or foreign object chewing can greatly increase the generated force, up to 230 pounds. These may result in noticeable symptoms like fractures or loose teeth, but not always — the damage may not be noticeable until much later in the form of excessive tooth wear.

These parafunctional habits aren’t the only cause for excessive tooth wear; tooth decay can weaken the tooth structure, making it more susceptible to wear. And, some restorative materials used for fillings may also affect the rate of wear.

Because excessive tooth wear may or may not present with immediate symptoms, it’s important to maintain regular dental checkups to monitor the condition of your teeth. Our training and experience helps us identify signs of excessive tooth wear and, depending on the extent of damage, work with you on a treatment plan. You should also keep us informed about oral habits, especially teeth grinding, thumb sucking or foreign object chewing (toys, nails, pencils, etc.).

Your teeth will wear as you grow older. By keeping a close eye on your teeth, we’ll help you keep that wear at a normal rate.

If you would like more information on preventing excessive tooth wear, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “When Children Grind Their Teeth.”


By Total Dental Care
March 16, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  

Root CanalOne of the most commonly feared dental procedures, root canals are often one of the least understood. Root canals are not dangerous or painful. Instead, a root canal from Total Dental Care in Pekin is a safe, effective and relatively pain-free dental procedure that is commonly used to repair or save a badly infected or decayed tooth.

Teeth can become badly damaged or decayed in a variety of ways. For example, repeated dental procedures, faulty crowns, deep decay, tooth trauma and cracks and chips can all cause a tooth to become internally infected or decayed. Once this happens, the infected material must be cleaned out in order to prevent further problems, such as bone loss, swelling and draining problems. This is done through a root canal.

How Do Root Canals Work?

During a root canal at Total Dental Care in Pekin, a dentist will use a special instrument to go in through the top (crown) of the tooth to clean out the tooth root and to remove any damaged, decayed or inflamed tissue. Once the infection is gone, the dentist will then fill in the area to help prevent further infection. The tooth is then covered with a filling or crown.

While the pulp of a tooth is important in helping the tooth grow, once the tooth has reached maturity, it is not necessary anymore. This is why your Pekin dentist at Total Dental Care can remove it without further damaging the tooth. Once the tooth has matured, it is nourished by the surrounding tissues instead of the pulp.

While many people are fearful of root canals, there really is no reason to be. The procedure is quite simple, and the doctors at Total Dental Care in Pekin have done the procedure several times. Furthermore, the process isn't painful. With today's modern anesthesia options, root canals are no more painful than having a filling placed. Root canals don't cause pain; they relieve the pain you already have.

If your tooth is damaged or decayed, a root canal will fix that. Call Total Dental Care in Pekin and set up your appointment for a root canal today.


By Total Dental Care
March 10, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   bonding  
ARoyalFix

So you’re tearing up the dance floor at a friend’s wedding, when all of a sudden one of your pals lands an accidental blow to your face — chipping out part of your front tooth, which lands right on the floorboards! Meanwhile, your wife (who is nine months pregnant) is expecting you home in one piece, and you may have to pose for a picture with the baby at any moment. What will you do now?

Take a tip from Prince William of England. According to the British tabloid The Daily Mail, the future king found himself in just this situation in 2013. His solution: Pay a late-night visit to a discreet dentist and get it fixed up — then stay calm and carry on!

Actually, dental emergencies of this type are fairly common. While nobody at the palace is saying exactly what was done for the damaged tooth, there are several ways to remedy this dental dilemma.

If the broken part is relatively small, chances are the tooth can be repaired by bonding with composite resin. In this process, tooth-colored material is used to replace the damaged, chipped or discolored region. Composite resin is a super-strong mixture of plastic and glass components that not only looks quite natural, but bonds tightly to the natural tooth structure. Best of all, the bonding procedure can usually be accomplished in just one visit to the dental office — there’s no lab work involved. And while it won’t last forever, a bonded tooth should hold up well for at least several years with only routine dental care.

If a larger piece of the tooth is broken off and recovered, it is sometimes possible to reattach it via bonding. However, for more serious damage — like a severely fractured or broken tooth — a crown (cap) may be required. In this restoration process, the entire visible portion of the tooth may be capped with a sturdy covering made of porcelain, gold, or porcelain fused to a gold metal alloy.

A crown restoration is more involved than bonding. It begins with making a 3-D model of the damaged tooth and its neighbors. From this model, a tooth replica will be fabricated by a skilled technician; it will match the existing teeth closely and fit into the bite perfectly. Next, the damaged tooth will be prepared, and the crown will be securely attached to it. Crown restorations are strong, lifelike and permanent.

Was the future king “crowned” — or was his tooth bonded? We may never know for sure. But it’s good to know that even if we’ll never be royals, we still have several options for fixing a damaged tooth. If you would like more information, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Repairing Chipped Teeth” and “Crowns and Bridgework.”




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Total Dental Care

(309) 347-7055
13 Olt Avenue Pekin, IL 61554